Singing for Snorers
Chronic snorers are singing a new tune, thanks to a new technique.

There are many different approaches to stopping snoring, but not all of them work for everyone.  Surgical answers have sometimes been considered as a last resort, but there may be a gentler alternative.  In 1999, a research group in the United Kingdom conducted tests to see if singing exercises could be used to strengthen the palate, causing it to be less flabby and ultimately, less likely to vibrate and cause snoring.

The researchers found twenty people who snored on a nightly basis.  These subjects were recorded for seven straight nights to track how often they snored, and how loud their snoring was.  At the end of the trial period, the subjects were recorded again.  The recorders were voice activated, so they only recorded the nightly snore fest. Following the initial recording period, the subjects were given singing lessons.  These people were also instructed to perform voice exercises for twenty minutes each day over a period of three months.  The researchers called or dropped in to visit their subjects on a regular basis, to encourage participation and check their progress.  They were thrilled at the results, which proved that those who practiced the exercises according to their routines, and who were not overweight, definitely made improvements.

It's interesting to note that the woman who ran this study, Alise Ojay, was a drama therapist.  She had suggested singing exercises to help a friend whose relationship was faltering due to his incessant snoring.  After giving her a recording of his nightly racket, her expertise as a choir director told her that his palate sounded like it needed some exercise.

After the success of the university study, Ms. Ojay began to design an exercise program that could be completed by snorers at home, on their own schedules.  In two years, she had devised a complete do-it-yourself program.  In total, three audio CDs of vocal instruction were compiled, to exercise the soft palate and throat areas. The completed program, called "Singing for Snorers", concentrates on exercises that effectively strengthen these muscles.

While these "Singing for Snorers" exercises have proven successful for many, they're not for everyone.  Those who report the highest levels of success tend to have begun snoring later in life.  They are not overweight, and they do not suffer from physical nasal or throat blockages such as nasal polyps or tonsil difficulties.

If you, or the noisy person in your bed, can benefit from this program, you should know that it requires a commitment to performing daily exercises.   The "Singing for Snorers" program is available to purchase online at singingforsnorers.com for about $85 U.S.  It's a small price to pay for a silent night.