Acid Reflux: Tips and Treatment
Imagine visiting your doctor for a routine checkup, and being told that you have "Gastro esophageal reflux disease."  This news would likely leave you feeling horrified and fearing the worst.   It is, however, a common condition that is easily treatable.  Despite its menacing, difficult-to-pronounce name, Gastro esophageal reflux disease is nothing more than Acid Reflux.

While annoying, common acid reflux does not present immediate health dangers, and it's usually treated quite easily.   Acid reflux is a disease that occurs when the stomach releases digestive fluids back up into the esophagus.  This action can cause inflammation and damage to the esophageal lining. The regurgitated acid most often consists of a few compounds including bile, pepsin and stomach acid.  The stomach acid used in the digestion of food can be a major irritant to the esophagus, as it has a tendency to damage tissues.  Bile is created in the liver and may become "backed up" into the stomach, causing it to be released by acid reflux. Pepsin, the last common compound, is actually an enzyme that helps to kick-start the stomach into breaking down proteins.

If you become afflicted with acid reflux, you'll probably be facing the disease for the rest of your life.  The Esophagitis that is caused by acid reflux can also be expected to be a life-long condition.  Once you begin treatment for acid reflux, your doctor will likely advise you to continue taking the medication for as long as you want and need prevention from the disease.  Research indicates that all people will eventually be faced with frequent regurgitation. However, those who become afflicted with acid reflux are known to have a higher acid content in fluids brought into the esophagus, than the fluids of those individuals who don't suffer with the disease.  Further, the fluid also tends to stay in the esophagus for longer periods of time in those who have acid reflux.

Our bodies do their best to prevent acid reflux from causing actual harm.   While you are awake, a simple swallow can usually remedy the reflux.  The saliva generated in our salivary glands contains bicarbonate, which is an agent that neutralizes the effects of acid.  However, we are usually horizontal when we sleep, causing acid to rest in the esophagus for longer periods of time, leading to greater damage.

There are many reasons that people suffer from acid reflux, and the same person can actually experience one or more of several problems throughout the course of their illness.  Acid reflux commonly leads to heartburn, which is the primary characteristic and defining symptom of the condition.  The pain caused by acid reflux can be similar to a serious heart condition known as angina.  For that reason, it's important to see your doctor to determine the cause of your pain, and rule out heart disease.  

Persistent heartburn and nausea are the two most common reasons why people discover that they are afflicted with reflux.  Acid reflux is most commonly experienced after eating a meal, since this is the period of time in which the reflux is most likely to occur.  People who are afflicted with acid reflux can also experience full regurgitation of fluid, leaving a nasty taste (and possible esophageal damage) behind.  Nausea will sometimes occur those suffering with acid reflux, and it may be accompanied by full-out vomiting.  

If you find that you often suffer from heartburn and nausea, see your doctor.  If he or she diagnoses acid reflux you can begin treatment immediately and feel better fast.